Chickpea Kuri Curry

I wanted to branch out a bit and try a couple of new things, so a couple of months ago I tried to plant Jamaican pumpkin, blue Hubbard winter squash, and red kuri squash in the garden. Sadly, my attempts failed. So when I saw red kuri squash at New Leaf Market, I had to try it.

Not entirely sure what to do with the red kuri squash, I took a hint from the vegetables moniker and decided to make a kuri curry. With inspiration from the Quick Chickpea Curry recipe in the Everyday Food Magazine (January/February 2010), I made several modifications to make the recipe my own.

Red Kuri Squash
Red Kuri Squash

To get started, thinly slice one medium onion and mince four cloves of garlic.  Saute the onion and garlic in about 1 tablespoon olive oil over medium heat until the onions become translucent.

Onions and Garlic
Onions and Garlic

Dice the red kuri squash into 1/4 inch cubes and saute the squash, onions, and garlic over medium heat until the squash is soft, about 7 minutes.

Kuri Squash and Chickpeas
Kuri Squash and Chickpeas

Once the squash is soft, add two cans of drained and rinsed chickpeas, four tablespoons of ketchup, 1-1/2 teaspoons of Penzy’s Balti seasoning, one teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper. I like the taste of the Balti seasoning, but your favorite curry powder would be a g0od substitute.  Stir to combine.

Penzeys Balti Seasoning
Penzeys Balti Seasoning

Add two cups of water and bringthe mixture to a boil over medium-high heat. Once the mixture reaches a boil, reduce the heat to low, cover the pan and simmer the mixture until thickened, about 25 minutes. In my opinion, the dish almost resembles baked beans when it is ready.

Simmering Curry
Looks Like Baked Beans

To make the meal a bit more substantial and to provide more color, I served the curry on a slice of pita bread with two handfulls of baby arugula. I added a dollop of plain greek yogurt to add some creaminess and cut the heat from the Balti seasoning a little bit. The unique bite of the Balti seasoning (it’s not like any other curry powder I’ve ever eaten) with the mellow, almost nutty taste of the squash and the texture of the chickpeas (which hold up well and do not get too mushy from the cooking) make the chickpea kuri curry a great use for the winter squash that refused to grow in my garden. I did save some of the seeds from the red kuri squash and I hope to be making this dish again next year with red kuri squash from my garden.

Chickpea Kuri Curry
Chickpea Kuri Curry
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